NewsWorld in talks as baby's life support to be disconnected

World in talks as baby's life support to be disconnected

Indi Gregory suffers from a mitochondrial disease that prevents the body's cells from producing energy and, according to the British health service, is incurable.
Indi Gregory suffers from a mitochondrial disease that prevents the body's cells from producing energy and, according to the British health service, is incurable.
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ed. KBŃ
7:41 AM EST, November 12, 2023

The parents of eight-month-old Indi Gregory, suffering from an incurable disease, faced a loss in an appeal court on Friday. The court stuck to their decision of discontinuing the life support extended to their daughter. This ruling exhausts most, if not all, opportunities to appeal against the judgment.

Indi Gregory is a British citizen battling a mitochondrial disease. This rare condition impedes cells from generating energy, leading to severe health complications. The British health service deemed this disease incurable.

Child's life-support disconnection decided

When medical professionals at the Queen's Medical Center (QMC) in Nottingham decided they could not provide further aid to little Indi, they petitioned the court to permit them to turn off her life support. The court ruled positively on this request.

Indi's parents, Dean Gregory and Claire Staniforth, protested against the court's verdict. After losing numerous appeals related to the life support termination for their daughter, they desired to carry out this procedure at home, rather than in a hospital or hospice. Alas, their plea was denied by the court of appeal on Friday.

Judge Peter Jackson, presiding over the case, branded the appeal as "completely unjustified". He also voiced "deep concern" about the recent proceedings in the court dispute.

Judge Jackson highlighted that doctors caring for Indi and other severely ill children confront an "extremely challenging" situation. He emphasized that "manipulative procedural tactics" aiming at reversing orders rendered by judges will not be tolerated.

Italy steps in

At the start of the week, the Italian government bestowed Indi Gregory with the country's citizenship in order for her to receive treatment in a Vatican hospital, which had expressed willingness to admit her.

Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni declared: "They say that little Indi doesn't have much hope, but until the end, I will exhaust all my means to safeguard her life. Also, to defend her parents' rights to do all within their power for her." The government of Giorgia Meloni announced funding for the infant's treatment.

Nonetheless, the British court did not consent to transporting the girl abroad.

Indi Gregory's case reflects a recurring conflict between the medical professionals and parents of critically ill children in Great Britain. The feud pertains to the child's right to treatment and life preservation. According to British law, the key matter in similar situations is the child's best interest, even when the parents are opposed to it.

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