NewsWoman opposed Elon Musk's demands. She got fired right after

Woman opposed Elon Musk's demands. She got fired right after

Elon Musk has another problem. The US administration bodies are siding with the employee he fired from Twitter.
Elon Musk has another problem. The US administration bodies are siding with the employee he fired from Twitter.
Images source: © Getty Images | Bloomberg
ed. KRO
3:37 PM EDT, October 14, 2023

The female employee objected to the obligation to return to the office, which Elon Musk imposed on everyone after taking over Twitter. The corporation responded by firing her. However, the woman complained to the American labor relations regulator, who agreed with her in this dispute.

The X Corporation (formerly Twitter) has been accused by a former employee of violating federal law, which prohibits companies from punishing employees for communicating or organizing with others about working conditions. The American businessinsider.com reported this from the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), a governmental administration body.

Fired for opposition

This is the first case examined by the NLRB against X. It pertains to a complaint by Yao Yue, a lead software engineer, who disagreed with the policy change ordered by Elon Musk. The billionaire, after taking over the company, demanded all employees to return to the office permanently.

If you can physically get to the office and you do not show up there, (your - ed.) resignation (has been - ed.) accepted - said Elon Musk.

CNBC reports that Yao Yue criticized the change of working conditions. She wrote an appeal on Twitter at that time, in which she stated that her colleagues should not give up remote work and allow themselves to be dismissed. On the official Slack channels, she added: "do not get fired. Seriously".

The female engineer was fired five days later in November 2022. The company stated in its justification that she had violated the company's policy.

Did Twitter break the law?

According to the portal axios.com, the complaint reads that X "unlawfully fired an employee for exercising his right to protected activity" guaranteed by American law.

Neither X, nor NLRB responded to BI's request for an immediate comment. However, as the portal emphasizes, the questions were sent outside of the standard business hours of press offices.

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