US NewsTikTok paid for the creator's travels to Washington

TikTok paid for the creator's travels to Washington

UNITED STATES - MARCH 13: Summer Lucille, a TikTok content creator, is seen outside the U.S. Capitol before the House passed the Protecting Americans from Foreign Adversary Controlled Applications Act, that could ban TikTok in the U.S., on Wednesday, March 13, 2024. (Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 13: Summer Lucille, a TikTok content creator, is seen outside the U.S. Capitol before the House passed the Protecting Americans from Foreign Adversary Controlled Applications Act, that could ban TikTok in the U.S., on Wednesday, March 13, 2024. (Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
Images source: © GETTY | Tom Williams
1:22 PM EDT, March 14, 2024

Leading popularity figures travelled to Washington to voice their disappointment after the House decides to ban the app in the States within six months possibly.

In a strategic move amid potential legislative challenges in the United States, TikTok has mobilized a unique asset: its network of influential content creators. The platform, a subsidiary of the Chinese conglomerate ByteDance, initiated a campaign last week to enlist numerous creators, facilitating their journey to Washington D.C. Their mission: to oppose a congressional bill threatening TikTok's operations in the U.S. This legislation mandates ByteDance to divest its interest in TikTok or face a ban.

Despite these efforts, the House of Representatives approved the bill, showcasing significant bipartisan agreement. Nevertheless, TikTok and its creator advocates are not deterred, setting their focus on the Senate, where the bill's future remains uncertain.

This advocacy differs from traditional lobbying efforts because creators were not compensated for their support. TikTok covered their travel, accommodation, and meal expenses, including a celebratory dinner at the Bazaar by José Andrés, located in the Waldorf Astoria. These creators emphasize that their participation is personal, sharing heartfelt stories about TikTok's impact on their lives. This approach echoes TikTok's strategy last year when it brought creators to Washington to support CEO Shou Chew's congressional testimony.

UNITED STATES - MARCH 13: TikTok supporters are seen outside the U.S. Capitol before the House passed the Protecting Americans from Foreign Adversary Controlled Applications Act, that could ban TikTok in the U.S., on Wednesday, March 13, 2024. (Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 13: TikTok supporters are seen outside the U.S. Capitol before the House passed the Protecting Americans from Foreign Adversary Controlled Applications Act, that could ban TikTok in the U.S., on Wednesday, March 13, 2024. (Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)© GETTY | Tom Williams
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