NewsHouthi threats disrupt key maritime routes and global trade routes

Houthi threats disrupt key maritime routes and global trade routes

The Houthis have been attacking ships in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden since November 2023 (illustrative photo)
The Houthis have been attacking ships in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden since November 2023 (illustrative photo)
Images source: © Getty Images | 2024 Mohammed Hamoud

6:49 AM EDT, May 17, 2024

Supported by Iran, Yemeni fighters from the Houthi movement announced on Thursday that they will attack all ships heading to Israeli ports. This includes commercial vessels not only in the Red Sea but also in the Mediterranean Sea.

Yemeni rebels from the Houthi movement, backed by Iran, declared on Thursday their intention to target all ships en route to Israeli ports. According to information provided by the Reuters agency, their targets will encompass commercial vessels in both the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.

Houthi leader warns

Abdulmalik al-Houthi, the leader of the Houthi movement, announced this on Yemeni television. The leader of the fighters, whom Iran supports, called on China, Russia, and European and Asian countries to refrain from transporting goods to Israeli ports.

Al-Houthi referred to these ports as "occupied Palestinian ports," suggesting that Israel illegally controls them. Since November 2023, the Houthi movement has been carrying out attacks on ships in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. This is part of their campaign of solidarity with the Palestinian terrorist organization Hamas, which is waging war with Israel in the Gaza Strip.

Transport costs rising

The Houthi attacks on commercial ships have increased maritime transport and insurance costs on key trade routes from Europe to Asia. As noted by the Reuters agency, shipping companies have been forced to abandon routes through the Red Sea in favor of longer and more costly voyages along the southern coasts of Africa.

This underlines the complicated situation on trade routes, which have become conflict zones between various groups. This impacts the global economy, forcing companies to seek alternative, often more expensive, solutions.

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