NewsGerman Space Commander warns: Russian orbit nuclear detonation may lead to catastrophic outcome

German Space Commander warns: Russian orbit nuclear detonation may lead to catastrophic outcome

SAINT PETERSBURG, RUSSIA - JANUARY 26 (RUSSIA OUT) Russian President Vladimir Putin leaves the ceremony at the Baltic Shipyard to start construction of the nuclear icebreaker Leningrad, January,26,2024, in Saint Petersburg, Russia. President Putin is having a four-day trip to Saint Petersbirg prior to the 2024 Presidential Elections. (Photo by Contributor/Getty Images)
SAINT PETERSBURG, RUSSIA - JANUARY 26 (RUSSIA OUT) Russian President Vladimir Putin leaves the ceremony at the Baltic Shipyard to start construction of the nuclear icebreaker Leningrad, January,26,2024, in Saint Petersburg, Russia. President Putin is having a four-day trip to Saint Petersbirg prior to the 2024 Presidential Elections. (Photo by Contributor/Getty Images)
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8:32 AM EST, February 19, 2024

Speaking at an event affiliated with the Security Conference in Munich, Traut conveyed the growing concerns over the possibility of Russia developing anti-satellite nuclear weapons, noting that "there are more questions than answers".

Traut's warning discussed the aftermath of a massive nuclear explosion in space. Such an event could produce an electromagnetic pulse powerful enough to decimate satellites in low Earth orbit, leading to devastating results.

"If someone has the audacity to detonate a nuclear weapon in the upper layers of the atmosphere or even in space, it will signify the end of the usefulness of global objects," Traut stated.

The repercussion of such an attack would transform thousands of operational satellites in orbit into debris, generating dense fields of fragments in the process.

"Such an action would leave no satellite unscathed - be it Chinese, Russian, American, European - nothing would survive," said Traut. "Rational calculations would deter anyone from deploying such a weapon in space," added the German Major General.

Ludwig Möller, director of the European Institute of Space Policy, suggests that a Russian attack on space, targeting commercial satellites, could wreak economic havoc. The financial impact on the banking and energy sectors could potentially cost trillions of dollars.

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