LifestyleFlower pots' decorative role and hazards: Why orchids and other plants may suffer

Flower pots' decorative role and hazards: Why orchids and other plants may suffer

Not many people know, but a pot and a cover are two different things.
Not many people know, but a pot and a cover are two different things.
Images source: © Adobe Stock
3:22 PM EST, February 11, 2024

Traditional pots are typically made of fired clay or pottery. They are glazed on the outside, providing protection from absorption. The current selection of pot covers is impressively diverse, capable of truly enhancing a room's aesthetics. However, it's crucial to know that not all plants will thrive in such containers, and in some cases, these may even prove detrimental.

Be cautious when transplanting these plants directly into a pot. Their roots may rot

Pots often carry a tag labeled "pot" in stores. However, a "pot" is generally a plastic container in which we purchase a plant, whereas a pot cover is typically a ceramic or stoneware vessel closely resembling a pot in shape, but unlike a pot, it doesn't have drainage.

Drainage refers to the holes at the bottom of a pot. These holes ensure that excess water is drained out, thus preventing overwatering and root decay, either of which can prove fatal to the plant. Pot covers were designed to house pots. Without a pot within, they merely serve as attractive room decorations. Unfortunately, not all plants are well-suited for being kept in pot covers, as attested by veteran gardeners.

Indoor flowers, whose roots require ample sunlight, should not be kept in pot covers. Such plant species include orchids and prayer plants. It is best to house an orchid in a transparent, plastic pot, which allows more light to reach its roots - an essential factor for their healthy growth. The prayer plant, on the other hand, needs good aeration, but a ceramic pot cover significantly limits the fresh air access to its roots.

Apart from these, most other flowering plants fare best in a pot, which can in turn be housed in a ceramic pot cover. When watering the plants, simply lift them out of the cover. Only return them once you're sure the soil has fully absorbed the water.

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