LifestyleErectile dysfunction drugs ingredient may lower Alzheimer's risk, UCL researchers find

Erectile dysfunction drugs ingredient may lower Alzheimer's risk, UCL researchers find

Do potency drugs protect against Alzheimer's disease? - illustrative picture
Do potency drugs protect against Alzheimer's disease? - illustrative picture
Images source: © Adobe Stock | Yuri Arcurs peopleimages.com
8:51 AM EST, February 26, 2024

Researchers from the University College London have made an unusual discovery. They found that sildenafil, an ingredient present in drugs for erectile dysfunction, could potentially lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Their conclusions are drawn based on the analysis of multiple pertinent cases.

It is critical not to self-medicate with erectile dysfunction medications, especially in high quantities, without the guidance of a medical professional. The side effects could lead to detrimental impacts on your health.

An unexpected "side effect" of erectile dysfunction drugs

The team of British scientists sifted through databases to locate men over 40 who were users of erectile dysfunction medications. They uncovered 269,700 cases between the years 2000 and 2017. The researchers then determined how many of these men were later diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Out of this cohort, 1,100 cases of Alzheimer's were identified. The findings suggest that erectile dysfunction drugs may help reduce the risk of this disease.

The analysis revealed that a specific component plays a key role in the process. This substance, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (abbreviated as cGMP), serves as a "messenger" in blood vessel expansion. Significantly, its presence also plays a role in Alzheimer's disease; a lower amount of it in the brain leads to a faster deterioration in a patient's condition.

The researchers noted that the efficacy of the "side" effect of erectile dysfunction drugs largely depends on the dosage. It appears that more frequent use of these medications can better guard the body against the disease in question.

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