NewsDwindling optimism among Ukrainians about country's future, Razumkov Center survey reveals

Dwindling optimism among Ukrainians about country's future, Razumkov Center survey reveals

Ukrainians are increasingly evaluating the situation in the country negatively. New poll.
Ukrainians are increasingly evaluating the situation in the country negatively. New poll.
Images source: © PAP | YAKIV LIASHENKO
3:56 PM EST, February 7, 2024

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Of the survey's respondents, 21 percent were unable to form an opinion on Ukraine's trajectory.

Interestingly, the results also show that 33 percent of participants believe Ukraine can overcome its present difficulties within the next few years. Meanwhile, 42 percent envisage this taking place over a longer time frame.

A mere 9 percent of participants think that Ukraine is incapable of surmounting its current problems.

When compared to the previous year, the proportion of optimists has fallen from 49 percent to 33 percent, and the percentage of pessimists has grown from 3 percent to 9 percent.

Ukrainians lament increasing prices of basic goods

A prominent concern among respondents is the escalating cost of basic goods and utilities—confirming this issue were 86 percent of those surveyed.

In addition, 46 percent of participants expressed dissatisfaction with the government's treatment of citizens and salary levels. The conduct of law enforcement officers has also been flagged as a concern by 41.5 percent of respondents.

Conversely, respondents reported no significant changes in areas such as pensions, healthcare, freedom of speech, democratic principles, and education. Defense capabilities and Ukraine's international reputation were areas where respondents noted some improvement, with 51 percent and 50.5 percent recognition, respectively.

Survey conducted in Kyiv-controlled regions

The Razumkov Center, a Ukrainian non-profit organization concentrating on Ukrainian politics, conducted the survey between January 19-25, 2024.

A diverse range of 2000 adult participants from Kyiv-controlled regions, including Zaporizhzhia, Mykolaiv, Kharkiv, and Kherson were sampled in the study.

The surveyors note a potential statistical error of less than 2.3 percent. They also cite possible additional discrepancies due to the ramifications of Russian aggression, including mass forced migration.

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