NewsCzech President's stark forecast for 2024. Surging tensions and dwindling support in Ukraine

Czech President's stark forecast for 2024. Surging tensions and dwindling support in Ukraine

The President of the Czech Republic, Petr Pavel, harshly assessed the situation on the front in Ukraine.
The President of the Czech Republic, Petr Pavel, harshly assessed the situation on the front in Ukraine.
Images source: © Getty Images | Bloomberg

2:31 AM EST, December 20, 2023

The situation in Ukraine at the close of 2023 appears bleak. An unsuccessful counter-offensive, power disputes, and insufficient support from the USA and Western Europe characterize the conditions. Successive leaders prepare people for a challenging 2024, while Moscow appears content.

"We're facing a completely new situation that we'll need to handle. And so far, all signs indicate the change won't align with our ideal scenario," summarizes Petr Pavel, President of the Czech Republic, formerly a high-ranking officer in the military.

According to Pavel, Ukraine, along with its allies, anticipates a challenging year in 2024.

Petr Pavel informed Seznam portal reporters that a "significant change" is expected in Ukraine next year, and unfortunately, it's not likely to be good news. He likely refers to the front lines, where the aggressors force their way forward with increasing difficulty while gaining new positions. Concurrently, the Ukrainian army faces growing problems with dwindling support.

The Czech president called on the West to unite and increase their support for Kiev.

Pavel believes Vladimir Putin awaits the potential victory of Donald Trump in the American elections, anticipating they could negotiate despite the feelings of Ukraine or the rest of Europe. Peace in Ukraine? Not this time. The Russians have their plan and will implement it ruthlessly.

Pavel assesses Putin won't participate in peace talks until the American election results are known, at which point he will attempt to sway events.

"How much longer will the war last?" is a question on many minds, not just those in Ukraine. According to Denys Prokopienko, commander of the 12th Special Forces Brigade "Azov" of the National Guard of Ukraine, Ukrainians and their allies should brace for a prolonged war. His argument bears weight.

The head of NATO also addressed the topic of the conflict and Ukraine's future.

If Putin prevails in Ukraine, the aggression isn't likely to stop there, warns NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. He assures that the only way to defeat the Russians is to win the war and expel them permanently from Ukraine. If the conflict remains unresolved, Russia may attack in a few years, possibly even NATO.

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