US NewsBiden administration sets ground rules for federal use of artificial intelligence

Biden administration sets ground rules for federal use of artificial intelligence

RALEIGH, USA - MARCH 26: US President Joe Biden along with vice president Kamala Harris (not seen) and North Carolina governor Roy Cooper (not seen) delivers remarks about healthcare in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States on March 26, 2024. (Photo by Peter Zay/Anadolu via Getty Images)
RALEIGH, USA - MARCH 26: US President Joe Biden along with vice president Kamala Harris (not seen) and North Carolina governor Roy Cooper (not seen) delivers remarks about healthcare in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States on March 26, 2024. (Photo by Peter Zay/Anadolu via Getty Images)
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11:30 PM EDT, March 28, 2024

On Thursday, the Biden administration introduced three new policies aimed at directing the federal government's application of artificial intelligence. These standards are presented as a benchmark for international initiatives, addressing the swift advancements in AI technology.

AI regulations

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) unveiled its inaugural federal-wide policy on Thursday, outlining the approach agencies should take to balance the potential risks and advantages of AI technology.

This policy mandates that agencies must disclose their use of AI, including the associated risks and their risk management strategies, to the public.

High-ranking officials from the administration informed journalists on Wednesday that the OMB's directive would equip agency heads, including chief AI officers or AI governance boards, with the necessary insights to independently evaluate their AI tool usage. This includes identifying shortcomings, avoiding biased or discriminatory outcomes, and recommending enhancements.

Vice President Kamala Harris revealed the new regulations during a call with journalists, emphasizing that the development of these policies involved contributions from both public and private sectors, including computer scientists, civil rights advocates, legal experts, and business executives.

AI applications

The federal government has reported over 700 instances of AI application and future plans across various agencies. Notably, the Defense Department is managing more than 685 unclassified AI initiatives, as documented by the bipartisan Congressional Research Service.

Other agency disclosures reveal the diverse use of AI, including documenting potential war crimes in Ukraine, testing if smartphone-captured cough sounds can identify COVID-19 in asymptomatic individuals, preventing fentanyl trafficking across the southern border, aiding in the rescue of sexually exploited children, and detecting illegal rhino horns in air travel luggage, among numerous other applications.

Source: USA Today, The Washington Times

Source:EssaNews
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