NewsBaltic states team to fortify against potential Russian attacks

Baltic states team to fortify against potential Russian attacks

KRAKOW, POLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Ceremonies at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with the participation of the Polish Army during the Independence Day celebration on November 11, 2023 in Krakow, Poland.
On November 11, Poland celebrates National Independence Day. To celebrate Poland regaining independence in 1918, after 123 years of partition, Krakow first held a mass in the Wawel Cathedral and then a patriotic march took place through the city. The celebrations ended with a parade of representative vehicles of the uniformed services and horse formations. (Photo by Klaudia Radecka/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
KRAKOW, POLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Ceremonies at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with the participation of the Polish Army during the Independence Day celebration on November 11, 2023 in Krakow, Poland. On November 11, Poland celebrates National Independence Day. To celebrate Poland regaining independence in 1918, after 123 years of partition, Krakow first held a mass in the Wawel Cathedral and then a patriotic march took place through the city. The celebrations ended with a parade of representative vehicles of the uniformed services and horse formations. (Photo by Klaudia Radecka/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Images source: © GETTY | NurPhoto
5:03 PM EST, January 25, 2024

Aiming to stave off potential Russian attacks, the Baltic states plan to construct a defense line integrated with a range of interconnected bunkers. "We will establish a Baltic defense line to protect NATO's eastern flank," asserted Andris Spruds, Latvia's Defense Minister. This claim was made on Friday following a meeting with his counterparts from Lithuania and Estonia, Arvydas Anusauskas and Hanno Pevkur.

President Rinkeviczs emphasized that building the Baltic line should stem from not only the Baltic countries' mutual cooperation but also agreements with Poland and Finland. "Decisions regarding the creation of common defense infrastructure should be agreed upon by military specialists from the Baltic countries, Poland, and Finland. This is because Latvia belongs to the common NATO defense planning system," he stated.

"We are close to war"

"We sense that war is near, and we understand that if Russia is not halted in Ukraine, it will advance further, potentially targeting the Baltic countries next," said Lithuanian diplomate Gabrielius Landsbergis on Monday in Brussels. "Nobody knows the timeline for Russia's madness," he added.

The proposed Baltic defense line, featuring various structures, aims to significantly bolster Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia's ability to secure their borders, as well as delay a potential adversary's actions. Estonia has already publicized plans to construct 600 defensive bunkers along the Russian border.

Alongside the agreement for the Baltic defense line, the defense ministers of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia signed a letter of intent concerning the intensified joint use of multiple rocket launchers. "The Baltic states' capacities for long-range operations are continuously developing," stated the Estonian Ministry of Defense on Portal X.

Right now, the Latvian Armed Forces are designing a detailed plan for bolstering the country's eastern border and hindering military movements. The document, outlining how to ensure Latvia's defense and deter adversaries, is set to be released to the government by the end of the month.

Does Poland need its own defense line?

When questioned if such a defense line would also prove effective for Poland, Gen. Waldemar Skrzypczak, former army commander, responded positively. He emphasized the importance of this approach especially regarding the Suwalki corridor and possibly the "Brest operational direction."

"During peacetime, we have not prioritized defense preparations much. Such preparations include terrain adaptation for action, which involves creating a comprehensive system of engineering barriers, fortification barriers, floodable areas to obstruct adversaries, and mineable areas. Such projects need to be planned and executed during peacetime because constructing fortifications becomes impossible once wartime operations commence," he explained.

Sources: PAP, Interia

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