NewsAmerican law should be rooted in the Bible, says the same justice who claimed embryos are babies

American law should be rooted in the Bible, says the same justice who claimed embryos are babies

OMAHA, NE - May 10: On a computer screen, lab technicians view a 5-day-old embryo at the blastocyst stage of development at the Heartland Fertility in Omaha, Nebraska on May 10, 2022. The governance of embryos may be caught up in the trigger laws enacted after Roe v. Wade is potentially overturned by the Supreme Court. (Misty Prochaska For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
OMAHA, NE - May 10: On a computer screen, lab technicians view a 5-day-old embryo at the blastocyst stage of development at the Heartland Fertility in Omaha, Nebraska on May 10, 2022. The governance of embryos may be caught up in the trigger laws enacted after Roe v. Wade is potentially overturned by the Supreme Court. (Misty Prochaska For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Images source: © GETTY | The Washington Post
10:11 AM EST, February 23, 2024

Tom Parker, the Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, has voiced his backing for the Seven Mountains Mandate. This previously marginal ideology urges evangelical Christians to reform American law and society according to their faith.

One day, two loud statements

Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Tom Parker, on the same day he issued a ruling affirming fertilized frozen embryos as people, potentially limiting women's access to in vitro fertilization treatments, voiced support for an ideology urging evangelical Christians to reshape society by their interpretation of the Bible.

During an online broadcast hosted by Tennessee evangelist Johnny Enlow, Parker asserted that America was established as a Christian nation and expressed his endorsement of the Seven Mountains Mandate. This doctrine advocates for conservative Christians to influence key areas of American life, such as media, business, education, and government.

Parker lamented the perceived loss of control over government to others, emphasizing the need for Christians to reclaim these spheres. His statements, reported by Media Matters for America, underscore his belief that a theological perspective on life justifies legal protections for embryos, citing biblical passages to support his stance.

Republican trend

The confluence of Parker's legal opinion and his remarks to Enlow reflects a broader trend among Republican figures embracing Christian nationalist views, advocating for the alignment of laws with fundamentalist interpretations of the Bible.

House Speaker Mike Johnson, aligned with evangelical activist David Barton, further solidifies the connection between Republican leadership and the push to shape policy by religious principles.

Sources: NBC; TheNewYorkTimes

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