News21 million people lack water in Mexico City

21 million people lack water in Mexico City

21 million people lack water in Mexico City
Images source: © GETTY | Hector Vivas
12:02 PM EST, March 1, 2024

In Mexico City, North America's most populous city, a severe water crisis has escalated due to prolonged drought and inadequate rainfall, pushing the city's water supply system to its limits. Over 21 million residents face water shortages, with local authorities rationing water as reservoirs reach critically low levels. The city, built on a former lake bed, relies heavily on underground aquifers and the Cutzamala System for water, both of which are under strain from overuse and climate change. Infrastructure issues, such as leaks and aging pipes, compound the problem. This crisis is exacerbated by climate change, leading to warmer temperatures and reduced precipitation, further depleting water sources. The situation has sparked protests and forced residents to make significant lifestyle adjustments to conserve water.

In the heart of North America, Mexico City confronts a dire water crisis, exacerbated by prolonged drought and decades of insufficient rainfall, pushing its water supply system to the brink. Over 21 million inhabitants face severe water shortages, leading to rationing as reservoirs dip to unprecedented lows. Residents like Olga González in Coyoacán depend on irregular truck deliveries, highlighting the city's chronic water management issues. Mexico City's unique hydrological challenges stem from its history and geography. It is situated on a drained lake bed, heavily relying on depleted underground aquifers and an overburdened Cutzamala System for its water. The situation is worsened by climate change, with recent reports indicating record warmth and dryness, reducing the chances of replenishing essential water sources. This crisis underscores the urgent need for sustainable water management solutions in the face of rapid urban expansion, infrastructure decay, and environmental changes.

Obraz
© GETTY | Toya Sarno Jordan
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